Thursday, July 4, 2013

Pomegranate-Honey-Yogurt Pops-Cooling, Healthful, Delish



I’ve been sitting on my deck slurping popsicles. And feeling very virtuous as I do so: That's because even though they are extremely tasty, pretty and refreshing, they are also healthful. (And, the recipe is amazingly easy! )
      
These colorful pops contain only pure pomegranate juice (which is bursting with antioxidants and vitamins); low-fat vanilla yogurt (a good source of quality, lean protein), and just a touch of honey. In contrast to many purchased pops, these completely avoid artificial colors and flavors, fatty ingredients, and high fructose corn syrup. When my grandkids drop by, I'll be perfectly comfortable letting them cool off with as many of these pops as they like--well almost!  (For more pop flavors kids might especially like, check out my chocolate-banana or raspberry pops here.)

The simplest way to ready homemade pops like theses is to use 3-ounce plastic drinking cups and popsicle sticks from a craft store. To hold the sticks in place, just cover each filled cup with a round of aluminum foil; cut a slit in the center; and slip the sticks through the opening into the filled cups.

The pops here were made with a Zoku quick popsicle maker, which works great, too. If you decide to create your own recipes, note that reduced-sugar pops will usually work in commercial plastic popsicle molds and plastic cups. However, the Zoku specifically advises against diet or low-sugar recipes, warning that they stick in the molds. Since sugar is partly what keeps pops from becoming rock-hard, it’s best not to go completely sugar-free in any case. Remember not to overfill the molds or cups; the mixture expands a good bit when it freezes and you don’t want it to dislodge the stick or touch the foil covering the top.

Pomegranate-Yogurt-Honey Pops 

(Makes 6 3-ounce pops)
 
As the photos show, I made two-toned pops with by layering a bit of plain pom-honey juice on top the pom-vanilla mixture once it had frozen. Feel free to skip this step and just create pom-vanilla pops if you prefer.


3/4  cup vanilla low-fat or regular yogurt  
3/4 cup pure pomegranate juice, plus additional well-chilled pom juice for two-tone pops
1 to 2  tablespoons clover honey, or as desired

In a 2-cup or larger measure very thoroughly stir or whisk together the yogurt, juice, and honey until thoroughly blended and smooth

If making ice pops using 3-ounce plastic cups, pour the mixture into the cups until they are a little more than 3/4s full (or less, if adding a pure pom layer later). Cover each with a small square of foil; make a slit in the foil center tops; and insert wooden popsicle sticks into the cups. Freeze until the popsicles are frozen; depending on the freezer this may take 3 1/2 to 4 hours or longer. If adding pure pom juice for a second layer, remove the foil and add the juice, then return the cups to the freezer until the pops are thoroughly frozen. Remove the popsicles from the cups by dipping their exteriors in warm water for 10 to 20 seconds (don’t overdo it!), and/or flexing the cups until the popsicles loosen from the sides. If necessary, loosen the pops from the sides using a table knife to break the vacuum. 
If using a Zoku pop maker: Cover and refrigerate the juice-yogurt mixture until well-chilled, at least several hours. Have the Zoko maker thoroughly frozen (24 hours). Insert the Zoku plastic sticks into its molds as directed. Pour the mixture into the Zoku molds up to the fill line, or 3/4 full if making two-toned pops. When the pops are thoroughly frozen 5 to 7 minutes, add the pure pom juice to the fill line if making two-tone pops, then let freeze until both layers are frozen solid.  Remove the pops from the molds using the orange tool as directed. Do not try to pry the pops from the molds using a knife, as the interior of the molds may be damaged. Add new plastic sticks and make a second round of pops.

Eat the pops immediately or place in plastic baggies or containers and freeze for later use.

2 comments:

Plastic Cup for Water Cooler on July 5, 2013 at 11:04 AM said...

This is my first time visiting your website, but I found a lot of interesting information. From the volume of comments on your posts, I guess I am not the only one! Keep the good work up.

Nancy Baggett on July 8, 2013 at 1:18 PM said...

Thanks for stopping by. Yes, I have a ton of info/recipes on my site. And remember--I test my recipes thoroughly and most of them are original, not recycled from other. Do come back, and suggest my site to your contacts.

 

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